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Augmented Reality Trail

HERITAGE WEEKEND

Take a self-guided tour around Ballarat to view our diverse historical landmarks and experience a new way to interact with our heritage streetscapes. At each of the ten iconic locations, scan the QR code to experience them through a new augmented reality platform. Do the places look much the same as they did then, or have they changed over time? Be sure to complement your augmented reality experience with the audio tour of compelling stories told from various perspectives, featuring interesting and quirky facts about each location.

The City of Ballarat is on the traditional lands of the Wadawurrung and Dja Dja Wurrung People. We recognise that we have much to learn from their enduring connection to land, culture and history, and pay our respects their Elders past and present.

Before you begin this tour, take a moment to listen to local Wadawurrung woman Bonnie Chew welcome you to Ballarat and explain more about Wadawurrung connections to this land.
Phone with old Ballarat fire truck, golden compass, Ballarat fire station sticker and map hovering over it.

SCROLL

Let's go!

start here

Step one

Pick a theme

There are multiple ways you can do this tour. You can follow the stops in order from 1 to 10 or choose one of the three curated themes: Fortune Hunters, Making a Community, or A Changing World.

step two

visit each stop

If you are following the tour in person, when you get to each of the different sites you’ll find a poster with information about the stop and a QR code you can scan with your phone to learn more.

Alternatively, you can click through each stop on the website from anywhere.

step 3

experience the history

Read, listen and learn about the history and heritage at each site. Use your phone to engage with the interactive digital elements, including 360-degree views, animation, and then-and-now visual transitions.

start here

Let's go!

This tour has ten stops in total. You can do these in any order you choose, or you can select one of three curated tours. At each stop you can read about the history of the site, listen to audio stories about the site and engage with interactive digital elements that bring this history to life.

Explore Map
Fortune Hunters

When gold was discovered in Victoria in 1851, the rush was on. Visit these sites to discover more about how gold shaped the City of Ballarat.

Stop 1: Eureka Stockade site
Stop 3: Main Road
Stop 7: Ballarat Base Hospital

Making a community

Learn more about how the City of Ballarat grew and developed by visiting these key sites.

Stop 2: Ballarat Fire Brigade
Stop 6: Ballarat Railway Station
Stop 8: City Oval

A Changing World

The discovery of gold at Ballarat was a cataclysmic event that dramatically changed not only the population but also the landscape of Ballarat. Learn more by visiting these sites.

Stop 4: Yaramlok (Yarrowee) River
Stop 5: Mount Warrenheip
Stop 9: Lake Wendouree
Stop 10: Arch of Victory

All Stops

Learn about Ballarat's unique history by visiting all ten sites in this tour.

Stop 1: Eureka Stockade site
Through to
Stop 10: Arch of Victory

Let's go!

PLan your trip

THE TRAIL EXPERIENCE

Select a journey

Stop one
EUREKA STOCKADE SITE
Eureka Street, Ballarat East

This spot is the site of the battle of Eureka – what later became known as the Eureka Stockade. In the early hours of the morning of Sunday 3 December 1854, over 200 British soldiers surprised 120 sleeping rebels inside their hastily constructed timber stockade. The battle that followed was swift and deadly, and resulted in the deaths of six soldiers and at least 22 rebels, including one woman. The exact death toll, like many aspects of the Eureka Stockade story, is contentious.

STOP ONE
Stop two
Ballarat Fire Station
20-22 Barkly Street, Ballarat Central

This is the home of the Ballarat Fire Brigade, and is the oldest continually operating fire station in Australia. The brigade was established on 21 November 1856 at a public meeting at the Star Hotel on Main Road. A notice appeared in the local newspaper asking for ‘all persons willing to serve as members of the brigade’ to attend. The station building was erected on this site two years later in 1858.

STOP TWO
Stop THREE
Main Road
Bakery Hill

Main Road (known first as Main Street) was once the commercial and social heart of the bustling goldfields community of Ballarat. This was the main thoroughfare into Ballarat from Geelong. Buildings sprang up along the road as early as 1852 and over the next decade this area exploded into a hive of activity.

STOP THREE
Stop FOUR
Yaramlok (Yarrowee) River
Bridge Mall

Before the arrival of European squatters and gold seekers, the Yarrowee River was a key feature of Wadawurrung life. It was not only a source of food and water, but also a means of safe travel. Other landlocked tribes of the Kulin Nation were permitted to walk and hunt freely along the river on their way to the sea.

STOP FOUR
Stop FIVE
View of Mount Warrenheip
Corner of Dana and Lydiard streets

Just one of many breathtaking vistas in Ballarat, this view looks out over Ballarat East and all the way to Mount Warrenheip in the distance. With the arrival of European settlers in the 1830s and the discovery of gold in the 1850s, the surrounding landscape – described by one early settler as ‘the prettiest place imaginable’ – was dramatically and permanently transformed.

STOP FIVE
Stop SIX
Ballarat Railway Station
Lydiard Street North

This grand building is Ballarat Railway Station. It is one of just three surviving nineteenth-century station complexes in Australia with a train hall. The hall and the north station buildings were built in 1862. The south building with its impressive clock tower was added in 1889.

STOP SIX
Stop SEVEN
Ballarat Base Hospital
Drummond Street North

On Christmas Day 1855, 7,000 people marched up Sturt Street and gathered on this site to witness the foundation stone being laid for the construction of Ballarat’s public hospital.

STOP SEVEN
Stop EIGHT
Ballarat City Oval
Mair Street

Ballarat City Oval is located at the intersection of Mair, Pleasant and Sturt streets, adjacent to Lake Wendouree, on the site of the historic Royal Saxon Company’s gold mine. Mining started here in 1859 but was not very successful and the mine closed in 1867.

STOP EIGHT
Stop NINE
Lake Wendouree
Lake Wendouree

Lake Wendouree is one of Ballarat’s most iconic locations. The lake is popular with locals and visitors alike for its picturesque views, recreation and sporting activities. Lake Wendouree was formally a swamp and was an important campsite for the Wadawurrung people. From 1839 European pastoralists William and Archibald Yuille claimed a large section of land including the swamp, which became known as Yuille’s swamp. When surveyor W S Urquhart camped in the area in 1852, he named it ‘Wendourre’, a name derived from Wadawurrung language.

STOP NINE
Stop TEN
Arch of Victory
Sturt Street

The Arch of Victory, one of Ballarat's most iconic structures, stands at the entrance to Australia's longest commemorative avenue of honour. The grand arch was erected in 1920 to honour those who enlisted in World War I and to commemorate the allied victory. Standing approximately 18 metres high and 20 metres wide, it is the largest commemorative arch in Australia.

STOP TEN
Finish
Stop one
EUREKA STOCKADE SITE
Eureka Street, Ballarat East

This spot is the site of the battle of Eureka – what later became known as the Eureka Stockade. In the early hours of the morning of Sunday 3 December 1854, over 200 British soldiers surprised 120 sleeping rebels inside their hastily constructed timber stockade. The battle that followed was swift and deadly, and resulted in the deaths of six soldiers and at least 22 rebels, including one woman. The exact death toll, like many aspects of the Eureka Stockade story, is contentious.

STOP ONE
Stop THREE
Main Road
Bakery Hill

Main Road (known first as Main Street) was once the commercial and social heart of the bustling goldfields community of Ballarat. This was the main thoroughfare into Ballarat from Geelong. Buildings sprang up along the road as early as 1852 and over the next decade this area exploded into a hive of activity.

STOP THREE
Stop SEVEN
Ballarat Base Hospital
Drummond Street North

On Christmas Day 1855, 7,000 people marched up Sturt Street and gathered on this site to witness the foundation stone being laid for the construction of Ballarat’s public hospital.

STOP SEVEN
Finish
Stop two
Ballarat Fire Station
20-22 Barkly St, Ballarat Central

This is the home of the Ballarat Fire Brigade, and is the oldest continually operating fire station in Australia. The brigade was established on 21 November 1856 at a public meeting at the Star Hotel on Main Road. A notice appeared in the local newspaper asking for ‘all persons willing to serve as members of the brigade’ to attend. The station building was erected on this site two years later in 1858.

STOP TWO
Stop SIX
Ballarat Railway Station
Lydiard Street North

This grand building is Ballarat Railway Station. It is one of just three surviving nineteenth-century station complexes in Australia with a train hall. The hall and the north station buildings were built in 1862. The south building with its impressive clock tower was added in 1889.

STOP SIX
Stop EIGHT
Ballarat City Oval
Mair Street

Ballarat City Oval is located at the intersection of Mair, Pleasant and Sturt streets, adjacent to Lake Wendouree, on the site of the historic Royal Saxon Company’s gold mine. Mining started here in 1859 but was not very successful and the mine closed in 1867.

STOP EIGHT
Finish
Stop FOUR
Yaramlok (Yarrowee) River
Bridge Mall

Main Road (known first as Main Street) was once the commercial and social heart of the bustling goldfields community of Ballarat. This was the main thoroughfare into Ballarat from Geelong. Buildings sprang up along the road as early as 1852 and over the next decade this area exploded into a hive of activity.

STOP FOUR
Stop FIVE
View of Mount Warrenheip
Corner of Dana and Lydiard streets

Just one of many breathtaking vistas in Ballarat, this view looks out over Ballarat East and all the way to Mount Warrenheip in the distance. With the arrival of European settlers in the 1830s and the discovery of gold in the 1850s, the surrounding landscape – described by one early settler as ‘the prettiest place imaginable’ – was dramatically and permanently transformed.

STOP FIVE
Stop NINE
Lake Wendouree
Lake Wendouree

Lake Wendouree is one of Ballarat’s most iconic locations. The lake is popular with locals and visitors alike for its picturesque views, recreation and sporting activities. Lake Wendouree was formally a swamp and was an important campsite for the Wadawurrung people. From 1839 European pastoralists William and Archibald Yuille claimed a large section of land including the swamp, which became known as Yuille’s swamp. When surveyor W S Urquhart camped in the area in 1852, he named it ‘Wendourre’, a name derived from Wadawurrung language.

STOP NINE
Stop TEN
Arch of Victory
Sturt Street

The Arch of Victory, one of Ballarat's most iconic structures, stands at the entrance to Australia's longest commemorative avenue of honour. The grand arch was erected in 1920 to honour those who enlisted in World War I and to commemorate the allied victory. Standing approximately 18 metres high and 20 metres wide, it is the largest commemorative arch in Australia.

STOP TEN
Finish

Get Social

Share your AR experience

Join the City of Ballarat and celebrate the Ballarat Heritage Festival. Share your experiences of the augmented reality trail and our rich historical locations. Use the hashtags #ballaratheritagefestival or #visitballarat to keep up to date and share all that is great about the Ballarat Heritage Festival.

Credits and Acknowledgements

This heritage tour was produced by Way Back When Consulting Historians and Tech Studio, for the City of Ballarat. Sound production and design by Wind & Sky Productions. Special thanks to voice actors: John Bolger, Liza Dennis, Paul Michael Donovan, Barry Gilson and Liana Skewes.  Welcome to Country by Bonnie Chew, Mirriyu Cultural Consulting. ‘Place-we-be’ soundscape created by deborah N (aka Deb Lowah Clark) and community members Sarah Jane Hall, Bonnie Chew and Tony Lovett with production support by Dave Clark.

The City of Ballarat acknowledges the Traditional Custodians of the land we live and work on, the Wadawurrung and Dja Dja Wurrung People, and recognises their continuing connection to the land and waterways. We pay our respects to their Elders past and present and extend this to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

City of Ballarat | Copyright 2021 | Audio and Historical Research by Way Back When | Website, Design and Augmented Reality by Tech Studio